Moshe’s Story: Chapter 5

Chapter 5

Liberation was difficult for all of the survivors. Many of the Displaced Persons, like Moshe and Berek, found themselves lost in foreign places, hungry, without family or any belongings. At least Moshe and Berek had each other. They were determined to find their way back home together.

Testimony: “The Road To Nowhere”

“A man tapped me on the shoulder.”

—Moshe Goldfeier

Moshe’s brother, Berek.

Moshe’s brother, Berek.

Moshe found his cousin, Hannah Rosenberg, once he made his way to Lodz, and confirmed that his mother and sister had been murdered in Auschwitz. He also learned that his father had survived, but wasn’t sure how to get in touch with him. Moshe’s cousin had been back to Brzeziny since liberation, and reported that there was nothing for which to return to their hometown. Moshe realized that staying in Poland would be difficult, and decided to make his way out of Europe and to try to go to the Mandate for Palestine. In October 1945 Moshe and Berek arrived in Regensburg, Germany.

Testimony: “Tragedy In Regensburg”

“I wish I had never been there.”

—Moshe Goldfeier

After Berek’s tragic murder in 1945, Moshe stayed in Germany for several years. In 1948, he married Angie, who had been so kind to him during his period of mourning for his brother. Together, Moshe and Angie were able to move to the United States in 1950.

That same year, Moshe learned that his father had survived and was living in Israel. Moshe maintained a correspondence with his father through the years. By 1955, when Moshe became a U.S. citizen and received a passport, he hadn’t seen his father in 16 years. Finally, he was able to use his new passport to visit his father in Israel. They saw each other every year thereafter. In 1975, Moshe had arranged to bring Berek’s body from the Regensburg cemetery to Israel. Simcha Goldfeier passed away in 1989 and was also buried in Israel.

Moshe and Angie.

Moshe and Angie.

Moritz (Moshe) Goldfeier, center, with his children, grandchildren, and other family members.

Moritz (Moshe) Goldfeier, center, with his children, grandchildren, and other family members.

Chapter 5



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